School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing Seminar Series

11 Oct 2017 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
more info
Wellington campus
Room 5D12 (Block 5, Level D, Room 5D12),
18 Oct 2017 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
more info
Wellington campus
Room 5D12 (Block 5, Level D, Room 5D12),
25 Oct 2017 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Wellington campus
Room 5D12 (Block 5, Level D, Room 5D12),
8 Nov 2017 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
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Wellington campus
Room 5D12 (Block 5, Level D, Room 5D12),
15 Nov 2017 1:00 PM - 2:00 PM
more info
Wellington campus
Room 5D12 (Block 5, Level D, Room 5D12),

The School of Communication, Journalism and Marketing presents our annual seminar series, featuring presentations drawing on the latest research in journalism and communication.

Venue: Room 5D12 (Block 5, Level D, Room 5D12), Massey University, Wellington campus (or by Mediasite, links through webpage). Time: 1-2pm, biscuits provided, all welcome.

Wednesday 4 October

Came Back Haunted: Revisiting the Imperial Buildings

Presented by Mark Steelsmith

The modernist project was meant to remove nostalgia from architecture; like many high-minded ideals, though, the disruption of the people living in, and leaving memory traces on, the spaces has been underestimated. The violence, discord, sexuality, abjection, joy and boredom of the living haunts the space, too. Using Mark Fisher’s lost futures version of Hauntology as a frame in my practice-based research, I have studied this building via lived experience, other people’s recollections and archived newspaper articles. I have found that this building has a shaky future, as it is on the Earthquake-Prone Buildings list with a notice that it requires strengthening work before 15 June 2027. This fact makes the possibility of its demolition in the next 10 years quite high. Will it be saved? Will anyone miss it?

11 October

Not Your “Standard” Education Policy: National Standards, the Journalistic Identity and the Citizen-Consumer

Presented by Leon Salter

This paper discusses an analysis of daily newspaper editorial coverage of the National Standards education policy between 2009 and 2012. Also drawing on recent surveys of New Zealand journalists, I argue that the policy’s rhetorical emphasis on the dissemination of transparent achievement data carved out a role for journalism that chimed closely with identifications as liberal democracy’s fourth estate. However, when applied to the monitoring of schools, this journalistic identification relies on an assumption of the citizen as consumer, who desires the journalist to pass on neutral information in the form of league tables, in order to choose between products in an educational marketplace.

18 October

Leadership Communication: New Insights from the Chinese Ancient Classic Yi Jing (Book of Changes)

Presented by Dr. Mingsheng Li

Business leaders are exercising creative thinking to generate new ideas in response to the complexity and uncertainty of globalisation and glocalisation. Chinese classics provide a large pool of valuable resources. Yi Jing (or Book of Changes), the oldest of the Chinese classics, has played a very important role in shaping Chinese leadership communication styles and behaviour in the past 3,000 years. This presentation examines some of the leadership communication principles and strategies found in Yi Jing, including the concepts of change, yin and yang (the co-existence of contraries), a proactive approach to management, the doctrine of the mean, the attributes and aptitudes of a qualified leader, motivation, and conflict management, among others.

25 October

Communication and Sense-Making of Global Environmental Change

Presented by Prof. Victoria Wibeck

8 November

Making Risky Choices: Modelling Journalists’ Perceptions of Aggressive Newsgathering Practices

Presented by Dr. James Hollings, Dr. Thomas Hanitzsch & Dr. Ravi Balasubramanian

Attempts to establish reliable predictors of journalists’ perceptions of the acceptability of various controversial newsgathering practices, such as deception and intrusion, have so far produced inconsistent results. The use of these practices is likely to become more common, and sometimes necessary, due to the increased need for verified content in an environment of competing “alternative facts” in a post-truth age. However, little is known about what causes journalists to use or avoid these practices, even when justified. This paper addresses that gap by proposing an exploratory theoretical model, based on risk-taking theory, that identifies constructs that could be used to predict journalists’ use of these practices.

15 November

Conceptualisations of Space and Citizenship in the New Zealand News Media’s Coverage of Homelessness

Presented by Dr. Teresa Housel

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